Building Bridges

The monthly newsletter of the Prison Action Network

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Sunday, May 15, 2011

MAY 2011












We publish latebreaking announcements and news here every month between editions. To go directly to the May issue of Building Bridges, please scroll down.




POSTED TUESDAY MAY 26 - BY ALL THINGS HARLEM

Rally and Press Conference held by VOCAL in support of ending the stop and frisk policies of the NYPD and for restoring the right to vote to all people upon release from prison. Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow, is one of the speakers.

If you missed Michelle Alexander's appearance at Riverside Church in NYC last Saturday May 21, or even if you were there but missed the press conference outside, here's a link to video coverage of the press conference: click here



POSTED MAY 23

Rally to “Award” Bloomberg for making NYC #1 in Marijuana Arrests: Racial Bias, Illegal Searches, Fiscal Waste

When: Wednesday May 25, 2011 – 10 a.m.

Who: Community Leaders, Legal Experts, People Directly Impacted by These Arrests, and
City Council Members Letitia James, Melissa Mark-Viverito and Jumaane Williams.

Where: Mayor Bloomberg’s Upper East Side Apartment 17 East 79th Street, between 5th and Madison

Why: New York City is #1: Thanks to Mayor Bloomberg, NYC is the marijuana arrest capital of the world.

Marijuana possession arrests are the number one arrest in NYC, making up 15% of all arrests
Over 50,000 marijuana possession arrests in 2010, despite marijuana possession being decriminalized in 1977.
Extreme racial bias: 86% of those arrested are Black and Latino despite whites smoking at higher rates.
Targeting Youth of Color: Over 55% of those arrested are between 16 – 24 years old, mostly young Black and Latino men.
Illegal searches and false charges: the NYPD is illegally searching people or “tricking” people to show them the marijuana in their pockets so they can arrest them for public possession

Fiscal Waste: $75 Million a year being spent on these marijuana arrests, while essential social services are being cut or eliminated.

The Hypocrisy of Mayor Bloomberg: He said he smoked marijuana and enjoyed it, but has overseen 100,000’s of arrests of young people of color.


POSTED MAY 20

Wednesday, May 25, 12 noon-2 pm Judicial Process Commission's (JPC's) 39th Annual Luncheon
  
2011 Founders' Award Recipient
Donald Thompson, Easton Thompson Kasperek Shiffrin, LLP
Speaking on:
When Innocent People go to Prison: "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice"

Justicia Awards
Jane Coons, Volunteer and Board Member, JPC; Ed Johnson, Volunteer, JPC; Rasheema Renee Vick, Counselor, Rochester Correctional Facility
 
Outstanding Mentor Award
Veronica Sanders, Faith Community Adult Mentoring Project
 
Mail-in Registration Form
Send checks payable to Judicial Process Commission at 285 Ormond St., Rochester, NY 14605
Name(s) ___________________________________
Organization Affiliation_________________________
Email ______________________________________

Levels of support
Guest  $30___   Supporter $50___  Sustainer $75 __ Sponsor $100 ___   Other ___

Location: Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh St. Rochester




BUILDING BRIDGES MAY 15 2011

HEADLINES: SENATOR TOM DUANE SPONSORS THE SAFE PAROLE ACT, BILL S5374
NYS PAROLE REFORM CAMPAIGN UNVEILS NEW INTERACTIVE WEBSITE

Dear Reader,

I've been waiting to write those headlines for a long time! What a credit it is to all the people who brought us to this point! Those people include the 2005 Lifer's Group at Otisville who started us down this path, the families who attended four Family Empowerment Days and then went on to form the Coalition for Fair Criminal Justice Polices which provided the direction: change the law so our loved ones don't keep being denied parole solely on the basis of their crime. Thanks to the Policy Group who spent the next two years revising Exec. law Sec. 259-i, the Sentencing Project who helped us form a strategy team which, among other things, has brought 60 advocacy organizations on board and all the families and advocates who wrote and called their legislators. Thanks to the organizations who have put the SAFE Parole Act on their legislative agendas. There is strength in numbers, and already we're so many that I'm worried I'm leaving some out.

Special thanks to 1000 Kites (http://www.kitescampaigns.org/) for building us an interactive website (www.parolereform.org) which will make the rest of our struggle a little easier. Please use it to tell your stories, take action, and learn more.

We especially thank Senator Duane for sharing our vision and introducing it. Please join us in thanking him: duane@senate.state.ny.us, Room 711-B Legislative Office Building, Albany, NY 12247, (518) 455-2451 and 322 Eighth Avenue Suite 1700, New York, NY 10001 (212) 633-8052.

IT'S TIME TO STOP - FOR A LITTLE MINUTE - TO BREATHE IN THAT FEELING OF SUCCESS AND HOPE; GIVE A WHOOP AND A HOLLER FOR PERSEVERANCE, AND REAFFIRM OUR FAITH THAT TOGETHER WE CAN DO THIS!

OK! Now it's time to get back to work. We have passed our first hurdle but there's a rocky road ahead before our bill becomes law. It will need to be passed by the Senate Crime Victims, Crime and Corrections Committee chaired by Sen. Nozzolio, who has a history of opposing our issues and drafting bills we feel would send us back to the middle ages. Once passed out of that committee it will be presented for a vote by the entire Senate. Should they see the wisdom in voting for it (for one thing it would win our votes on election day!), it would then require the same to happen in the Assembly. (see a list of members on both committees in article #5) Even passage by the both houses will not be a certain victory. The Governor's signature would still be required, and take a 2/3 majority in both houses to override if he vetoed it. We do not currently have that much support. It is up to everyone reading this, and your family members, to let your legislators know how important parole board decisions are to you, and how much your welfare depends on the passage of S5374, the SAFE Parole Act. You can do that at (www.parolereform.org) and then follow up with a personal phone call or visit. [Your legislator's home number will be on the website (when you take action) and you can use it to call to schedule an appointment.]

Please be well, keep the faith, share the news, and for everyone's sake, get involved!


Summaries of Articles

1. Actions, Event and Meetings include Coalition for Women Prisoners Advocacy Day in Albany on behalf of the the Domestic Violence Survivors Justice Act. [with dates for NYC and phone pre-trainings]; Presentation of the SAFE Parole Act on March 19 at the Chelsea Reform Dem Club, with Tom Duane; March 21 appearance of Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow at Riverside Church; Buffalo PRP2! meeting on May 23, Manhattan meetings on May 17 (Milk Not Jails), May 18 (NY Reentry Roundtable), and May 19 (Coalition for Women Prisoners) as well as regularly scheduled support group meetings. You can keep busy working for justice almost any day!

2. The Coalition for Fair Criminal Justice Policies is passionate about bringing deserving men and women home from prison through better parole policies, but the question throughout the process from arrest through sentencing, potential incarceration, and parole release should be: where do we want this person to end up? This is called Reintegrative Justice.

3. Legislation: S 338/A 154 expands Merit Time eligibility to include violent crimes (with some exceptions) and the list of criteria for receiving merit time has also been expanded.

4. DOCS and the Div. of Parole have merged into DOCCS (Dept. of Corrections and Community Supervision); The Parole Board will maintain its independence.

5. NYS Parole Reform Campaign is now at WWW.PAROLEREFORM.ORG. Visit this new interactive website where you can view people speaking about their parole experiences, leave your parole story on the storyline phone, and take several actions, including sending Senator Duane a thank you letter. It includes a list of members of both committees in the legislature who have to pass it before it can move to a vote of each house.

6. Parole News - 134 interviews, 30 released, 4 on initial hearings. (Still none in the Elmira or Watertown hubs.)

7. A link to The SAFE Parole Bill S.5374 in its entirety, plus what we know about TAP and risk and needs assessments. Called a “mark-up”, the bill S5374 shows the changes that constitute the SAFE Parole Act. It contains all the language in the governor’s revision. The SAFE Parole Act removes all the crossed out language and adds the CAPITALIZED words.

[For copies of any document, article or legislation referred to, or condensed, in this issue, please send an email to PAN with a request clearly stating number of the article and the date it appeared -Ed.]


1. ACTIVISM: ADVOCACY, EVENTS AND MEETINGS HAPPENING AROUND THE STATE THIS MONTH

ADVOCACY DAY
TUESDAY JUNE 7 COALITION FOR WOMEN PRISONERS ADVOCACY DAY
Get on the bus with the Coalition for Women Prisoners! We will be traveling to Albany to speak to legislators about the Domestic Violence Survivors Justice Act. This bill would provide much needed relief for domestic violence survivors whose abuse was a significant contributing factor to their involvement in the criminal justice system. By giving discretion to judges in the sentencing phase, and allowing currently incarcerated survivors to apply for re-sentencing, this bill would allow New York to take a significant step toward addressing the years of injustice faced by DV survivor-defendants whose lives have been shattered by abuse.
 
If you are in NYC, you can attend one of the following trainings which will be held at the Correctional Association (2090 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd., New York, NY 10027)    Friday, May 20th 10:00am-12 Noon   Friday, May 27th 4:30-6:00pm,    Saturday, May 28th 1:00-3:00pm,   Thursday, June 2nd 10:30am-12 Noon.  If you are outside of NYC, there will be an Advocacy Day training conference call on Friday, June 3rd at 10:00am. Dial In: 888-387-8686 Conference ID: 9424797
 
Contact Jacqueline Velez, to register for the bus at 212-254-5700 or jvelez@correctionalassociation.org.

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BUFFALO VIGIL: Every Wed from 5-6 pm Erie County Prisoners Rights Coalition demonstration in front of the Erie County Holding Center, corner of Delaware and Church, in Buffalo. Stand for ending abuse.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

EVENTS:
MANHATTAN events
THURSDAY MAY 19, 7 - 9 PM CHELSEA REFORM DEMOCRATIC CLUB discussion on Prison and Parole Reform
Speaking will be Judith Brink of Prison Action Network, Leah Gitter of NAMI NYC, and Senator Tom Duane. Maria Reyes and Linda King from PAN will also attend. The meeting is open to the public. The SAFE Parole Act will be on the agenda.
Location: Hudson Guild, Elliot Center, 441 W. 26th St. (bet 9 & 10th Ave)

SATURDAY, MAY 21, 12:30 - 4 PM THE CAMPAIGN TO END THE NEW JIM CROW presents:
Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Round table panel discussion with Ms. Alexander to follow, with panelists Glenn Ford (Black Agenda Report), Annette Dickerson (Center for Constitutional Rights), Gabriel Sayegh (Drug Policy Alliance), Neil Franklin (Law Enforcement Against Prohibition), and Tina Reynolds (WORTH), moderated by Glenn Martin (David Rothenberg Center for Public Policy)

This half day conference **Free and Open to the Public** will also feature an art exhibit, film, resource information tables, Q & A, book signing

A Reception for Donors and Supporters: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Admission: $50 donation, 50% off The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Color Blindness Food, Drink & Guest Speakers

Location: Riverside Church South Hall, 490 Riverside Drive, N.Y., NY 10027
(enter between 120th and 122nd St. on Claremont Ave)

Visit our website at www.newjimcrow.org/register to register for the free event and to reserve your place at the VIP reception. Space at the reception is limited; your spot is confirmed upon receipt of payment
_____________________________________________________________________________

SAVE THE DATE: SAT. SEPT. 24 AT THE RIVERSIDE CHURCH: THE REV. AL SHARPTON, NEWARK MAYOR CORY BOOKER, AND CNN JOURNALIST SOLEDAD O’BRIEN will be among the participants at the upcoming national Think Outside the Cell symposium on issues affecting the incarcerated, the formerly incarcerated and their loved ones. www.thinkoutsidethecell.org for more info.
_____________________________________________________________________________

MEETINGS:
ALBANY meeting and STATEWIDE conference call
SUNDAY, MAY 15, 7:00 P.M. NEW YORK STATE PRISONER JUSTICE NETWORK
Post advocacy day discussion: what does it all mean for the direction of the New York State Prisoner Justice Network? Join in the next series of meetings as we discuss and analyze the day and figure out the Network's priorities!
Location: 33 Central Ave, Albany NY 12210
call-in: 712-432-0111 code 106007#
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BUFFALO meetings
MONDAY, MAY 23, 6:30-8:30PM. PRISONERS ARE PEOPLE TOO considers the psychology of imprisonment.
In the summer of 1971, at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA, a group of 24 college students, U.S. and Canadian males, participated in an experiment which was designed to discover information about the “psychology of imprisonment.” In the basement of the Psychology Department Building, several classrooms had doors removed and replaced with bars and numbers. A hallway served as “the yard” and a closet was “The Hole” for “solitary confinement.” A coin toss determined which students would be prisoners and which would be guards. There were no clocks and no view of the outside world. The experiment, planned for two weeks, only lasted for six days.  What happened? Most of the guards became sadistic and some of the prisoners began to exhibit various pathologies, such as depression and a willingness to be victimized.
 
Prisoners Are People Too, Inc., usually screens documentary films. There is a documentary film about the Stanford Prison Experiment, “Quiet Rage,” but it is unavailable at this time. In lieu of the documentary, PRP2, Inc. will show a 2010 Hollywood film, entitled “The Experiment,” featuring Forest Whitaker and Adrien Brody. Much like the Stanford Prison Experiment of forty years ago, the men in this film find themselves in a simulated prison environment that spirals out of control. This film is rated R.

Location: Pratt-Willert Community Center, 422 Pratt Street
 
The Circle of Supporters for Reformed Offenders and Friends of BaBa Eng are the sponsors of PRP2 programs. For further information, contact Karima Amin: 716-834-8438 or karima@prisonersarepeopletoo.org.
_____________________________________________________________________________
MANHATTAN meetings
TUESDAY, MAY 17, 6:30PM-8:30PM MILK NOT JAILS planning meeting/conference call

We dressed up in an ice cream cone costume and met with elected officials during the NY State Prisoners Justice Advocacy Day; we had a whirlwind tour of farms in the Capitol Region and Hudson Valley who want to work with us; we are in the midst of designing marketing materials for farmers who want to work with us, an action plan for DAIRY DAY (June 4), coffee shop pledge drive, an ice cream social at the HOT FESTIVAL in July in NYC, and an August tour to Central and Western NY. Things are moving, but we need your help to make it happen! Light refreshments will be served.

Location: 666 Broadway 7th Floor, New York City
Take the B/D/F/V/6 to Broadway-Lafayette
Not in NYC? You can call into the meeting by dialing (712) 775-7200; Access Code 257779#

WEDNESDAY, MAY 18, 1 - 3PM NY REENTRY ROUNDTABLE
Dr. Robert Fullilove from Columbia U’s Mailman School of Public Health
Speaking on the public health consequences of mass incarceration.

Hosted by Community Service Society of NY (CSS); Kindly RSVP to Gabriel
Location: 105 E.22 St., at Park Ave So., Rm. 4A
6 or N/R train to 23rd St.

THURSDAY, MAY 19, 5-7 PM COALITION FOR WOMEN PRISONERS IMPORTANT MEETING
Discussion on Families, Incarceration & the new ASFA Law
A new law was passed in June 2010 that helps protect the rights of parents who are or were incarcerated, or in a residential drug treatment program, and have children in foster care.

The Incarcerated Mothers Committee will make a special presentation. Fathers welcome too! Contact: Stacey Thompson: 212-254-5700 Ext. 333, or email

Location: 2090 Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. (between W. 124 and 125 Streets, Suite 200
2/3 to 125 St. and walk 1 block west or A/B/C/D to 125 St. and walk 2 blocks east
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SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS:
ALBANY: Every Monday 7-8:30 pm PRISON FAMILIES OF NY Support Group Meetings Alison 518-453-6659
Every Tuesday at 6pm P-MOTIONS (Progressive Men Operating Towards Initiating Opportunities Now)  For information call Malik at 518 445-5487.

BROOKLYN:
Every Wednesday at 5:30pm VOCAL PAROLEES ORGANIZING PROJECT For more info call 917 676-8041

LONG ISLAND:
Tuesdays May 24 and June 14 (second and fourth Tuesdays) at 7:30pm PRISON FAMILIES ANONYMOUS SUPPORT GROUP at: Community Presbyterian Church, 1843 Deer Park Ave, Deer Park, NY.
Tuesday June 7 (first Tuesday) at 7:30pm at St Brigids Catholic Church, 75 Post Ave, Westbury, NY.
For information, please contact: Barbara: 631-943-0441 or Sue: 631-806-3903
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2. THE COALITION FOR FAIR CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICIES EMBRACES REINTEGRATIVE JUSTICE

Until the public understands that punishment doesn’t produce positive outcomes, the best laws in the world won’t make a difference. Although the Coalition for Fair Criminal Justice Policies is passionate about bringing deserving men and women home from prison through better parole policies, our ultimate goal is a system for dealing with crime that works for everyone. We envision policies that bring the arrested person back into his or her community as quickly as possible. We call that Reintegrative Justice. The question throughout the process from arrest through sentencing, potential incarceration, and parole release, should be: where do we want this person to end up? Looked at that way, it seems obvious that we want them returned to their families and communities as healthy and whole people who are able to contribute to society.

Long punishments don't prevent crime or encourage loving behavior, they are more likely to stir up anger and a desire for retribution on the part of victims, community and offender alike. Especially in light of the fact that prisons today have all but abandoned rehabilitative ideals.

At the core of the punitive culture we live in is the concept that a violent monster lives inside of us and only punishment can keep it under control. We say that’s hogwash!

The real truth is that much of behavior is situational. Treated violently for long enough and we become violent ourselves. Surrounded with love and support, provided with adequate housing, food, healthcare and education, everyone is capable of being or becoming a good person. Not a perfect person; there don’t seem to be any of them, but a person who can contribute to, rather than drain, our communities.

This is not a new concept. At their core most religions espouse the values of justice and mercy, forgiveness and redemption. Yet our society seems more toxic than ever with violence, retribution, punishment and suspicion. So what can we do to change it? How can we help people see that Reintegrative Justice is a win-win response to wrongdoing? Please contact us with your ideas, questions, invitations to meet. Let's brain storm about our terms, our strategies, and how to spread the word. The Coalition for Fair Criminal Justice Policies calls on you to unite behind Reintegrative Justice as the way everyone wins!



3. LEGISLATION STATUS:

MERIT TIME BILL # S 338/A 154 Sen. Montgomery/AM Aubry Introduced January 5, 2011
Expands Merit Time eligibility to include violent crimes except for crimes of incest, Murder 1, terrorism, aggravated harassment of a DOCCS employee by an inmate, or conspiracy to commit such offenses.
The list of criteria for receiving merit time has also been expanded:
(1)complete general equivalency diploma, educational requirements as determined by the department, or satisfactorily complete the equivalent of a semester of coursework sponsored by an institution of higher learning
(2) complete an alcohol and substance abuse treatment program, or a comparable program of a different type, including, but not limited to, anger management, family violence, or parenting
(3) complete a vocational training program or a comparable and equivalent training program
(4) perform satisfactorily for at least six months a skilled job assignment, including but not limited to, inmate program aide (ipa), law library clerk, medical/infirmary aide, children's center aide, food service worker; or
(5) complete at least four hundred hours of service as part of a community work crew

[We'll post short descriptions of relevant bills as they are introduced and keep you posted on their progress. Please email PAN, including the bill number, for a copy of the complete bill.]



4. MERGER OF THE DEPT. OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES AND THE DIV. OF PAROLE

The merger creates the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision (DOCCS). The Parole Board will function as an independent body and maintain its existing functions (release decisions, setting conditions for parole, etc.) Up to 19 members will still be appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. They will continue to be led by an appointed Chairperson, who currently is Andrea Evans. Although the Parole Board will function separately, with no change in the way it makes release decisions, it will be considered an operational component of DOCCS, and both will provide all appropriate services for all offenders, from entry to release, and from release through discharge.

DOCCS will be responsible for the care, custody, treatment and supervision of the individual, both in a facility and in the community. Community supervision will be the responsibility of a Deputy Commissioner who reports to the Commissioner (currently Brian Fischer).

The Parole Board will review and decide applications for 3-year discharge from parole supervision for indeterminately sentenced individuals, and will have the added responsibility of reviewing and deciding 5 year discharges for sex offenders with determinate sentences.

DOCCS will grant merit terminations from presumptive release, parole, conditional release and release to post-release supervisions for certain non-violent offenses. Also the department will take on mandatory and discretionary terminations of sentence for certain drug offenders and issue certificates of relief and certificates of good conduct.

Clemency and interstate transfers will continue to be processed as in the past. Reentry will be the responsibility of DOCCS and the Parole Board.



5. THE NYS PAROLE REFORM CAMPAIGN REPORTS THAT SENATOR TOM DUANE IS SPONSORING THE SAFE PAROLE ACT, S 5374.

Now that the SAFE Parole Act has a bill number and a sponsor, it's time for the heavy lifting. Not in the weight room but in the legislature. We need to build a strong grassroots base that will put pressure on legislators who will have to be convinced that sponsoring Senate Bill 5374, or at least to vote for it, is the smart thing to do. Personal stories are very important. They connect the words in the SAFE Parole Bill with human beings who are suffering under the weight of unfair parole board decisions. The good news is that now there's an easy way to get started!

This week we are inaugurating our new interactive website, www.parolereform.org where you can learn more about the SAFE Parole Bill, sign a petition, send a letter to your legislators and to the governor, and download materials to pass out where ever you go. There's much more at www.parolereform.org; you can tell your story on the 24/7 storyline and watch videos of others telling how they've been affected by unfair parole policies [to see more than one, click on the channel tab]. You can even use it to find out your legislator's phone #. When you take action and send the form letter on the site, you will see the name, photo, and phone # of each of your representatives in the state legislature.

It's important to start working right now, since this legislative session is over at the end of June. Plan to visit the site www.parolereform.org regularly. Tell everyone you know about it and invite them to do the same.

[Thanks to Thousand Kites who have done all the work of creating the website and who will continue to help us improve it and move it out into the public arena. Your feedback will help us. Let us know if you experience any difficulties. But most importantly, please use it. ]

(We need videographers in the Ithaca, Syracuse, and Binghamton areas. 1000 Kites supplies the cameras and the training, please email parole.reform@gmail.com if interested.)

FOLLOWING ARE THE MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEES WHERE OUR BILL WILL REMAIN UNTIL THE CHAIRS OF EACH RELEASE IT FOR A VOTE. We still need a sponsor in the Assembly. These committees have to pass our bill before it can be voted on by the respective full house. If one of them represents you and you want to change the Parole Board’s policies, you need to convince him or her to vote yes to pass the SAFE Parole Bill, S.5374.. It is now in the Senate Committee.

NYS ASSEMBLY CORRECTION COMMITTEE
Chair: Jeffrion Aubry
William Colton
Janet Duprey
Joe Giglio
Hakeem Jeffries
Tom Kirwan
Alan Maisel
Félix Ortiz
Teresa Sayward
Eric Stevenson
Harvey Weisenberg
Keith L.T. Wright



SENATE CRIME VICTIMS, CRIME AND CORRECTIONS COMMITTEE
Chair: Sen. Michael F. Nozzolio
John A. DeFrancisco
Patrick M. Gallivan
Joseph A. Griffo
Ruth Hassell-Thompson
Timothy M. Kennedy
Betty Little
George D. Maziarz
Velmanette Montgomery
José Peralta
Michael H. Ranzenhofer
Patty Ritchie
Gustavo Rivera


6. PAROLE NEWS: MARCH PAROLE RELEASES: 134 INTERVIEWS, 30 RELEASED, 4 ON INITIAL HEARINGS

MARCH 2011 PAROLE BOARD RELEASES – A1 VIOLENT FELONS – DIN #s through 1999 unofficial research from parole database.

[We've stopped publishing data sent by facilities, since we get that info (eventually) off the website. However the parole website doesn't list the parole commissioners who were at each hearing and it takes several months to get that information from the Parole Board. If you know which commissioners were at a given facility in a given month, starting with April, we would like it, and return the favor with a free membership in PAN for the reporter.]

MARCH TOTAL INTERVIEWS......# RELEASED. # DENIED..RATE OF RELEASE
27 initials.............................. 4..................... 23................ 15%
107 reappearances................ 26................... 81................ 24%
134 interviews...................... 30................... 104......................22%


MARCH INITIAL RELEASES (still none in the Elmira or Watertown Hubs, which have the worst records; 0 for Elmira, 2 in Watertown, in over 4 years)

FACILITY.........SENTENCE...........OFFENSE
Livingston.... 20-Life.......... Murder 2
Bayview........ 18-Life........... Murder 2
Wyoming...... 15-Life........... Murder 2
Collins......... 1-Life**.......... Murder 2 *
**received an additional sentence for attempted promotion of contraband 1, hence the 1 added on
*for deportation only


MARCH REAPPEARANCES
FACILITY.........SENTENCE................. OFFENSE........ # OF BOARD
Arthurkill................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 4th
Arthurkill................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2 . 6th
Arthurkill................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 8th
Arthurkill................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 10th
Auburn..................... 25-Life.......... Murder 2....... 5th
Bare Hill................... 25-Life.......... Murder 2....... 3rd
Fishkill..................... 17-Life.......... Murder 2....... 3rd
Fishkill..................... 17?-Life........ Murder 2....... 5th
Fishkill..................... 9-Life............ Murder 2....... 6th
Fishkill..................... 25-Life.......... Kidnap 1....... 10th
Franklin.................... 20-Life.......... Murder 2....... 4th
Franklin.................... 15-Life.......... Att Mur 1........ 10th
Gouverneur............. 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 6th
Gouverneur............. 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 7th
Green Haven.......... 20-Life.......... Murder 2....... 8th
Midstate................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 8th
Orleans.................... 25-Life.......... Mur pre-74.... 7th
Otisville.................... 18-Life.......... Murder 2....... 3rd
Otisville.................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 5th
Shawangunk.......... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 5th *
Shawangunk.......... 25-Life.......... Murder 2....... 5th
Southport................ 25-Life.......... Murder 2....... 3rd *
Sullivan.................... 15-Life.......... Murder 2....... 2nd
Wende..................... 20-Life.......... Murder 2....... 3rd
Woodbourne........... 17-Life.......... Murder 2....... 2nd
Woodbourne........... 25-Life.......... Murder 2....... 4th

*for deportation only



7. THE SAFE PAROLE ACT; AND WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT TAP AND RISK AND NEEDS ASSESSMENTS

Click here for a copy of the The SAFE Parole Act, S.7354. Deletions are crossed out; CAPITALS are the new language; all else is the original language of the current 259-i as rewritten by the governor.

DOCCS is required by law to implement an OFFENDER TRANSITION ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN (TAP) that includes an integrated team case management plan based on a research-based risk assessment tool.

What TAP instrument they will be using is not known, nor is the risk and needs assessment tool, but in 2009 the Division of Criminal Justice Services adopted a plan that may give us some idea of what we can expect. Click here to read NY’s Transition from Prison to the Community Model, essentially a TAP instrument, a plan that follows a person from arrest to discharge from state supervision.


Building Bridges is published by Prison Action Network as our way of communicating with our members.
If you would like to join, please give us a call at 518 253 7533 or send a note.